Pride and Prejudice: a chick-lit/flick moment

You scored as Elizabeth Bennet.

As one of Austen's most beloved characters, Elizabeth Bennet represents what most women would like to become: strong, independent, and loyal. Of course, she has her faults including a stubborn will of iron and a clinging to first impressions. Overall, Lizzie is bright and lovable…something to admire and aspire to.

Elizabeth Bennet

88%

Elinor Dashwood

81%

Emma Woodhouse

47%

Jane Bennet

44%

Charlotte Lucas

28%

Marianne Dashwood

19%

Lady Catherine

16%

The results of a "Which Jane Austen character are you?" quiz found here (faerieeve's Vox contains the actual link to the quiz site).

Having just watched the 5 hour BBC mini-series on DVD in 2 sittings, I've been sucked into the escapist world of Jane Austen.  I've decided the ideal place to watch my next Austen outing (or re-watch, as it may) would be in the bath with some lavender/rose/olde english smelling bubbles.  No disturbances, just me and the whole fantasy realm of southern England…no smelly farmhouses or starving noblemen, just pretty manor houses, countryside, and landed aristocrats riding horses.  Hahahahahahha, I can't help but laugh.  So modern and "vexing" and what visual delight nonetheless. 

Jane Austen laid it out Hollywood style in her novels—action (sort of), adventure (if the emotional kind), happy endings, and none of the truth of poverty and dirt that rural England actually had so much of.  But we neither want to read about it (not for escapism, anyway) nor do we want to watch it.  At least, not in a lush bath.  Oh sure, it actually alludes to all that stuff—the suffering of women who have no inheritance, etc., but it doesn't show the poor buggers whose entire lives might consist of digging peat blocks.  That would be for Monty Python, Charles Dickens, EM Forster, and all the other more sober and social-minded folks.

 

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